$888,000

CONDO AVG ASKING PRICE

$888,000

HOUSE AVG ASKING PRICE

$965/SQFT

CONDO AVG PRICE PER SQFT

$965/SQFT

HOUSE AVG PRICE PER SQFT

999 SQFT

CONDO AVG SIZE

999 SQFT

HOUSE AVG SIZE

4.6

CONDO AVG MONTHLY SALES

8.6

HOUSE AVG MONTHLY SALES

THE LOWDOWN

History

West Toronto Junction began as a railway town in the 1870s. A convergence of railway lines operated nearby and opened stations and railyards, attracting manufacturers and their employers to the area. Many of the houses closest to Dundas Street housed the labourers and their families that first settled here. Excessive drinking and rowdiness led to a prohibition on alcohol being sold on Dundas Street West that lasted until 2000.

In the late 1880s the development of the area was underway with newspaper ads luring buyers by offering lots with commanding views of Lake Ontario and High Park.  As the area became populated they incorporated as their own Village in 1891 which led to the development of churches, libraries and schools.  With the subsequent demand for better roads and utilities they eventually decided it was in their best interest to annex with the City of Toronto in 1909.

Housing and Accommodation

The Junction has some of the finest architecture in Toronto. Take a stroll through the winding tree-lined streets north of Annette Street and you’ll find many rich red brick Victorian houses on generous sized lots.  Closer to Dundas Street, these Victorian style houses become much smaller and start to lose their decorative charm. The lots at the north-end of the neighbourhood are also narrower. You will find a that a fair number of the larger houses particularly on the main streets have apartments with two or more units, a great location for income properties.  Your neighbour is likely family-oriented. Artists priced out of other neighbourhoods are looking here for well-sized homes with affordable prices.

JUST LISTED IN THE JUNCTION

ABOUT THE JUNCTION

The Junction has conquered the highs and lows and booms and busts of its time. From railway & manufacturing maven (Heintzman Piano Company, Canadian Cycle & Motor co; Canadian Pacific) to the deeply-felt depression of the late 1800s.

Culturally speaking, the area was first adopted by a number of Irish Catholics who found the overcrowded tenement housing in Cabbagetown and Brockton to be underwhelming. Today we continue to see the influence of the burgeoning local meat industry that drew flocks of Italians, Polish, Macedonians, and Croatians.

Today the area is drawing more and more residents.  With many cafes, taverns, restaurants, boutiques and parks, there’s a great vibe in the Junction.  Perhaps due to the not too long ago prohibition, there has been a boost of craft breweries and gastropubs in the area, making it a great destination for beer hopping.

The Junction is the perfect place for you if you’re looking for a neighbourhood that avoids ‘cookie cutter’ and embraces the idiosyncratic. This off-the-cuff quality has attracted a variety of residents and created a strong sense of community and identity. Classic brick stone residential homes, revamped industrial-finished lofts, and new builds, are all available in the area – making the options as unique as the people who inhabit them.

THE GOOD

      • Art festivities abound.
      • Young, hip and edgy.
      • Lots of parks and recreational space.

THE UGLY

      • Pockets of undeveloped areas.
      • Upper Junction is a short commute to the TTC line.