UPPER BEACHES

LISTINGS
SCHOOLS
DEMOGRAPHICS
SCORECARD

LISTINGS OF HOMES & CONDOS IN UPPER BEACHES

The Upper Beaches Neighbourhood of Toronto

The Upper Beaches and Greenwood-Coxwell area is filled with residential tree-lined streets. Sandwiched between the east end of the Danforth and Ashbridges Bay, you’re in a quiet nook. Look out for the coming summer, as you’ll be surrounded by beach-goers heading east for their walk along  the boardwalk at Woodbine Beach.

The area has many young families moving this way, as the area starts to gentrify and the prices for homes are a bit more affordable. There are lots of great restaurants scattered about Queen East, Gerrard Street East aka Little India, and even a few micro-breweries have popped up over the last few years. The area is up-and-coming, watch out for major growth here in the next decade.

AVERAGE CONDO

488,675

AVERAGE HOUSE

$1,319,400

AVG DAYS ON MARKET

7

Housing and Accommodations

This area is heavily dominated by semi-detached and detached homes most of which are two-storeys. If you’re looking to buy or rent three-bedroom homes, the Upper Beaches has plenty of options. Some properties are a bit out-dated but are more affordable than some other Toronto neighbourhoods, so it’s not unusual to see homes sell and then be completely rebuilt. If you’re looking for condos, this is not the place to find them. Though there are likely to be a few new developments in the upcoming years.

houses in the upper beaches toronto
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ELEMENTARY SCHOOLS

Duke of Connaught Junior/Senior School
Equinox Holistic Alternative School
Monarch Park Collegiate

SENIOR SCHOOLS

Duke of Connaught Junior/Senior School
St. Patrick Catholic Secondary School

DEMOGRAPHICS

location icon with text 2 km approx area
15% 0-14 years, 12% 15-24 years, 57% 25-64 years, 16% 65+ years
$65,887 average income
67% post secondary, 20% high school
population 14,417 51% women and 49% men
49% Rent, 51% Own
demographics stats for upper beaches toronto
plaque for historic norway post office in toronto's east end

HISTORY

The area, previously referred to as Norway (though no Norwegian immigrants resided here), was a postal village. The original post office existed at 320 Kingston Road in 1825. The area was also home to the Norway Steam Mills, a saw mill specializing in pine. By 1850 a few inns, taverns, and even a school were added around the saw mill and post office and the community was born.

Images: Hilde Melby & Alan L. Brown